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  • Electric Cars

    Out of curiosity how do people feel about EV's ?
    I bought my wife a Nissan leaf which is perfect for her around town as she never does more than 30 miles in a day( I kept my E Class Merc for longer trips )

    Has anyone else moved to electric?
    Human beings are seventy percent water, and with some the rest is collagen

  • #2
    I am half way there with a hybrid Lexus CT200h, but have also been looking at the Leaf which is very affordable and not too bad a design.

    When I used to do my long commutes (170 miles a day) I would have been too concerned with charging points and running out of juice, but now with much shorter commutes, the extra mpg the hybrid gives and also the surge of additional electrical power where it's needed have been greatly appreciated.

    If I could afford it I would buy a Tesla model S, my nephew moved to Sweden and works for Tesla, he loves their cars, but unfortunately can't get me an appropriate 80% discount.

    Key advantages now is getting by "Road Tax" through demanding payment of £0.00, the reduced costs of fuel and when I see signs in B'ham regarding Low Emissions Zones, I can drive into them without worrying about receiving fines through the post or wondering which roads I can now drive on or have to pay extra for.

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    • #3
      I had a Toyota Auris hybrid until some scumbag stole the cat converter wiped out the mpg advantage in one moment.

      The merc returns 60mpg better than the Toyota but the leaf is guilt free well almost
      Human beings are seventy percent water, and with some the rest is collagen

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      • #4
        Are we ready to be totally electric as in charging points plus the supply from the national grid?
        It seems this corona virus is challenging us to go green far sooner than previously set out by the government. First it was, wind power will generate enough power for every UK home by 2030 and now there is talk for the UK transportation to be fully electric by 2030.

        If the peat phasing out and brexit is a bench mark of us meeting these targets, then we have got no chance.

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        • #5
          If I still lived in London I’d be quite keen but I think it will be a long time before anyone will be driving electric cars here.

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          • #6
            My electric bill has gone up by a small amount it's about £5 per top up charge at night so even if the whole street had EV's I suspect the grid will cope for now.
            If I still lived in London I think its would be a practical alternative but we did have a drive so charging was doable and realistically exceeding the real world range would have been difficult due to traffic. High rise dwellers would struggle as would anyone with no off street parking.

            Even the Nissan is OK to drive albeit not exactly a premium build and with a 170 mile range its plenty for what we need but I could not manage without a oil burner as a reserve for longer trips. If however a 350-400 mile range is achieved I am pretty sure I could live with that as a main car.
            Human beings are seventy percent water, and with some the rest is collagen

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            • #7
              Did you buy the Nissan new, I guess if so the Battery has a warranty - if selling on does that warranty still apply ? I see you can now lease the Battery's if buying 2nd hand, my guess is it wouldn't then be that Economical BUT i haven't done the maths so probably talking out my butt

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              • #8
                It was new and has an 8 year battery warranty assume it will continue if we sell the car on.

                I used a 3 year PCP deal from Nissan and although I normally purchase vehicles outright when PCP finishes in this case I will almost certainly hand the car back as I expect by 2022 there will be better options with much greater range available. In a normal year I drive very few miles as my job is 100% home based and especially this year have hardly been anywhere only 1 trip to Portsmouth to say goodbye to my son before his ship deployed early August. The Nissan is used daily but so far has only done 940 miles in the year since February. My Mercedes has only done about the same biggest problem has been keeping the starter battery charged but solar trickle charger has fixed that problem.
                Human beings are seventy percent water, and with some the rest is collagen

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                • #9
                  I did consider buying a electric car recently, but as i have no driveway the charging is the big stumling block for me.
                  And I'm doing 40 mile journey to work round trip each day.
                  So would probably be charging twice a week with shopping runs and taxi runs with the mrs.
                  Do fancy the kia nero but very pricey for now

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by James HKT View Post
                    If I still lived in London I’d be quite keen but I think it will be a long time before anyone will be driving electric cars here.
                    Well some already are! The monied I expect. Go into any of the big malls in Bangkok and they have spaces with electric chargers, not much more than a token gesture I suppose, but at Central Chit Lom, at least, they are always in use when we are there.

                    'Tis me

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                    • #11
                      We have just helped my step-son to buy a nearly new Hyundai Ioniq Electric. Since arriving here from Thailand, he's done a variety of jobs - supermarkets, restaurants etc but over the last few years he's been working as a Private Hire driver (mainly for Uber) driving a leased petrol- hybrid vehicle here in London. This line of work seems to suit him so my wife and I decided to help him buy a vehicle outright.

                      While researching what vehicle to buy, it became obvious to me that all-electric was the way to go. The initial purchase price was just under £20,000 (2019 model with 3000miles on the clock) but he will recoup that in 5 years if he drives into Central London at least 5 times a week by avoiding the £15.00 congestion charge (Electric vehicles are Congestion Charge free until 2025).

                      It has been a steep learning curve for both of us. There are different types of charging sockets - type1/2/Granny/ChADdeMO etc and types of EV charging - rapid,fast and slow. The range of the vehicle is limited - about 150 miles.However due to the plethora of charging stations here in London , finding a public charger has not yet been an issue (he doesn't have an off-road facility) and he'll drive for about 5/6 hours then return home or to my wife's shop, re-charge it while having a rest and do another shift. It takes about 4 hours to charge from empty to full using a fast public charger- these are the most common ones here in London. Rapid charging takes takes under an hour but is not recommended to be used that often due to possible battery damage.

                      My research led me to believe that the cost of electricity to charge the vehicle would be half that of petrol but in the 3 weeks he's had the vehicle, he's done about 1200 miles and spent about £25.00 on charging electricity ( partly explained by the fact that some of the charging companies give a discount to taxi drivers). The battery has an 8 year warranty (so just under 7 years left).

                      When the car was up on ramps for the MOT( in readiness for the Private Hire Vehicle Licence inspection) it was amazing to see under the car. Just a flat clean surface with just brakes,suspension and wheels as possible area that may require future maintenance. All in all very impressed and he loves it. I'm now seriously thinking of getting rid of my petrol/hybrid and going all electric especially since the Government announcement re the banning of the sale of new petrol/diesel cars after 2030.I suspect the second hand car market in these vehicles is going to collapse as we approach this deadline, and petrol stations and garages will close while charging points will continue to abound.

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                      • #12
                        .I suspect the second hand car market in these vehicles is going to collapse as we approach this deadline, and petrol stations and garages will close while charging points will continue to abound.
                        I would expect the opposite as many people will want to keep running oil burners as long as possible unless of course they are actually banned from city centres as well. Sadly charging points are still rare outside of bigger cities but I think they will become more common as that deadline approaches.

                        I installed a 7.6kw charger in my garage and it can charge my Nissan in about 5 hours but so far we never allowed the battery to drop below 30% full

                        I find driving the leaf to be great fun and when returning home from the dealers discovered that when not in ECO mode the acceleration was bit scary as power is delivered instantly unlike a diesel. The e-pedal means I rarely touch the brakes and I had a moment of panic on my drive home because I was not sure if brake lights were switching on when slowing down (They are). The best thing is that when making very short trips the economy is the same as on long journeys and even when the battery shows 50% full you are 99% certain to get the remaining 80 miles range.
                        Human beings are seventy percent water, and with some the rest is collagen

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                        • #13
                          You might be right Ash, but the profit margins on selling petrol are so narrow that in my opinion there will come a tipping point where it will just not be economical for petrol stations to operate. At that point the market for petrol/diesel cars will decline as filling up becomes more difficult. Same for the garages servicing the petrol/diesel vehicles. I share your enthuiasm for EVs. Great fun to drive!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by khemerat View Post
                            I'm now seriously thinking of getting rid of my petrol/hybrid and going all electric especially since the Government announcement re the banning of the sale of new petrol/diesel cars after 2030.I suspect the second hand car market in these vehicles is going to collapse as we approach this deadline, and petrol stations and garages will close while charging points will continue to abound.
                            Do you think the government will enforce a ban of new petrol/diesel vehicles in 2030? The first phase of HS2 was due to be completed by 2026 and we all know that's not going to happen.

                            How will those living in high rise dwellings cope, as the population increase's we are more likely to build up. Then the power stations, Drax power station is burning roughly the entire UK wood production, shipping in excess of 1 million tons of wood pellets from the States. Since they started burning bio mass the co2 emissions have increased, that does not include the emissions to create the pellets then shipping them. Then take into account they are receiving 2 million a day in subsidies from the government, tax payers money.

                            I fully understand the need to go more green, just can't see them meeting any of these new targets they are coming out with.
                            Last edited by Greg / Pairin; 15 Nov 2020, 22:46.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by caller View Post

                              Well some already are! The monied I expect. Go into any of the big malls in Bangkok and they have spaces with electric chargers, not much more than a token gesture I suppose, but at Central Chit Lom, at least, they are always in use when we are there.
                              Sorry I meant where I live in Phuket.

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